Risk managers: Taking calculated risks to live a life of adventure. Written by MK McDonald

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Mountains inspire opposing feelings. Feelings of being tall and small simultaneously. Ego can reveal itself while mountaineering and in my experience, any extreme sport for that matter.  In contrast, there are also opportunities to become vulnerable, trekking on the outside of our comfort zone.  How do you find balance when there is so much going on externally and internally when attempting an unknown summit (Direction, safety, maslow’s hierarchy of needs, beauty and nature, photos, meeting like-minded folks,etc)?

In the last 10 years, I’ve finally started to realize while summiting and not summiting, I’ve become a risk manager. Although my parents describe my brother (we go on a lot of hikes together) and I as risk takers.  We are aware of the risks, but we push ourselves anyway. The stories about having to bail out on a hike, I believe are my favorite stories. The last time this happened that I couldn’t see my hand in front of my face because it was blizzarding so hard.(Last year, December 22nd on Pikes peak). My brother is born on the winter solstice and he always plans a “death march” as he calls it. This year we just went camping and stayed up to watch the meteor shower! Everyone thought we were nuts when packing up the car and it being snowing and freezing outside. We got to Penitente Canyon, presently a beautiful popular climbing spot with American Indian petroglyphs and Virgin of Guadalupe painted high on a canyon wall left there by Los Hermanos Penitentes, a Spanish religious sect that favored Penitente Canyon for its solace in the 1880s. This is how the canyon got its name.  Anyway, it was like the heavens opened up, the sky was clear, and it really wasn’t that cold (-4 degrees).

The last major trekking trip I went on was to hike two 14ers in the same weekend… Wetterhorn (class 3) and Handies (class 1) with my best friend Nikki.  Needless to say we rocked it on Wetterhorn, on the top it got sketchy. In fact a gentlemen, thank goodness for him, caught us going up the class 4 route. He said “where are you guys going.” And I was like” uh, to the top!” On the right trail we approached the top by climbing up a steep wall, definitely stepping/crawling outside our comfort zone.  At the top we took real selfies of our bare butts.

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The next day we had planned to do our first sunrise summit on Handies peak, a considerably shorter hike than Wetterhorn.  We got lost in the dark, took a wrong turn and felt pretty dumb.  We couldn’t bag an easy class one … whoops!  The sunrise was gorgeous, we were safe and we were still very high up.  You never know exactly what will happen in life as mountaineers and risk managers but we are aware of the outcomes. Keep pushing your comfort zone but know when to bail. Also, learn how to read a map, bring one, know where you’re going!  Understanding your ability and what your level of acceptable risk is, is an important first step before heading out on your next adventure.

MK is an Art Educator, Yogi, Colorado Native, Snowboard Instructor in the winter and Raft Guide in the summer. On her free days she is often travelling, trekking, camping, backpacking, taking a walk with hippopotamus (a special brown dog) hot springing, and all the outdoor things.  In the summer months you’ll find her in a foreign country or living in her 1970 red VW van down by the river! 

Follow MK’s adventures on Instagram!

Why is traveling with my children so important?

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I want you to close your eyes and fantasize about going on the vacation of your dreams with your family…your husband, your wife, your kids….

Are you day dreaming of a tropical beach, and laying on a lounge chair drinking a frozen daiquiri while the kids play for hours in the white sand? Or, are you picturing your beautiful family smiling in front of the Arc de Triomphe while noshing on a perfect croissant?

Now, open your eyes and remember this is real life. And, in real life, when traveling with your family, and especially young children, your strawberry daiquiri is most likely watery because you didn’t drink it fast enough due to separating non stop sand fights between your kids, and your toddler is most likely having an epic meltdown in front of that epic Arc.

So, you ask, if this is the case, and this is the reality of traveling with young kids, then why the heck have we traveled with our children over 20 times in the past few years?! The answer is simple: although it might not always be easy, or “picture perfect”, the experiences and memories made as a family far outweigh anything else.

Our day-to-day lives are filled with school drop offs, appointments, cell phones, meal preps, household maintenance and work. We go, go, go. When we travel, even if we are only a few hours from home, we slow down. We talk uninterrupted. We make eye contact. We laugh more. We connect. Without fail, I always find out something new about my kids each time we travel.

And, possibly, moreover the family connection and memories, we travel because it affects our children in such a profound way. Each and every place we visit raises questions of culture, future adventures, and personal discovery. I can see them grow on each new trip, and their “where are we going next” excitement in between in each trip is infectious, and drives us to never stop adventuring.

Although they might not remember all of our trips when they get older, I know that they are forever changed for the better for having the experiences. And, I am forever changed by experiencing the new adventures through their eyes.

xo Elisa

 

A Presidential discussion everyone can agree on: The Presidential Traverse

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Any avid hiker in the northeast knows about the Presidential Traverse.  A string of nine (or 10 if you include Jackson) summits threaded through the White Mountains of New Hampshire with water falls, glowing moss, and stunning summits, it’s no wonder this venture is on most hikers’ bucket lists. It was on mine and it only took me three attempts. Like so many others, my first two trips were canceled due to hurricane-like, 110 mph winds on Mount Washington. Little known fact: Mount Washington held the highest recorded wind gust for 62 years at 231 mph.

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Traverse Gear Check

I was looking to shed a little weight, so I packed my Deuter ACT Zero with all of the essentials. The Trail consists of 20,000 feet of elevation change over 23 miles, so I ditched the big camera bag and stuffed my point and shoot into my Deuter Zip Pack Lite. I’ve never used it for that purpose but was stoked to find out it fit perfect.

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One Day Or Two?

The Prezi can be done as a one-day sprint from dawn to dusk or as an overnighter. Wanting to spend as much time as possible in the mountains, we chose to do it over two days. We hiked it from north to south instead of the reverse. Hiking and rock scrambling 4,000 feet in the first four miles up to Mount Madison is an endeavor all in itself. The boulders we scrambled over were pitted and sharp from the intense weather, and I could only compare them to lava rock found in Hawaii. After you reach elevation, the hardest part is done and you can take in back-to-back summits miles of tremendous views.

rispoli4-1280x540This article was originally posted on the Deuter blog, check it out and give it a follow!

5 Budget Tips to stay warm on your next winter hikes!

I love researching gear almost as much as I love using it.  I truly believe that there is no one perfect piece of equipment, but with that state of mind there is always room for improvement.  The best equipment  can make your experience that much easier and more comfortable, but at a cost.  Top of the line shells, mid layers, and base layers could cost you well over $2000.00.  Some people may not have to bat an eye at that but I can’t even afford a Gore-Tex jacket right now.  People have been hiking throughout the winter long before $2000.00 outfits were ever an option.  Here are some budget tips to keep the money in your pockets and your feet outside.

 

  • Base Layer – skip the name brands.  I bought a cold weather merino wool base layer shirt for $20.00 on amazon from Sub sports.  I’ll admit it isn’t as silky smooth as the name brands but at less than half the cost you can still be warm without breaking the bank.  In my most recent snowshoe backpacking trek, the temps were low but the wind was almost nonexistent.  I snowshoed almost the entire trip with only that base layer as my only top. And yes, they sell pants too.

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  • Sleep Warm – Besides making sure your sleeping bag is the appropriate temperature rating for where you’re sleeping, boil water and slowly pour it into your water bladder (with cold water already in it).  Make sure it is good and warm and then take it into your sleeping bag with you.  It will keep your warm and your water won’t freeze overnight!

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  • Keep your socks dry – For an additional $14.00 you can get a cheap pair of gators off amazon.  Now admittedly, I have Outdoor Research Gators ($55.00).  Gators can keep the lower portion of your pants dry and keep snow out of your boots.  Being wet on your winter hike is bad news but there are ways around it.  Make a small investment and keep your legs/socks dry and warm.

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  • Outer shells – As noted above, I can’t afford Gore-Tex shells yet.  I already own a hiking rain jacket and I use it all year round.  With a proper base layer and mid layer a rain coat can keep you dry and keep the wind from sneaking in.  It is not very breathable, but I have never had a problem regulating my temperature by unzipping the jacket or its vents.  At a fraction of the cost it will do, until you can afford the best.

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  • Make warm meals – Oatmeal in the morning and your favorite freeze dried camping meals.  Oatmeal/fruit packets like Munkpack are great for hiking and it the winter and they are better warm.  Heat them up in hot water and warm up your core.  Also, the best hiking freeze dried foods must sit for almost 20 minutes before your can eat them.  Tuck them in close to your core and stay warm why you’re waiting.  I’ve been enjoying Backpacker’s Bistro.  No funny ingredients and it taste like real homemade food. Also, if you’re camping out- eat late.  Eating right before bed will also help keep your core warm when you get in your bag and will help you fall asleep more comfortably.

 

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