Want to make beautiful music while traveling? Our 5 favorite ways to bring our love of music into the outdoors or on the road!

If you haven’t guessed it by the title of our blog, we love music. Our boys’ room is music (and travel) themed and even has the quote on their wall, “Don’t bother to pack your bags, or your map, We won’t need them where we’re going, We’re going where the wind is blowing” from the band Weezer. We have been known to dabble with a few instruments, so we figured we would share the instruments that we thought were the best for travel.
The instruments I focused on were small, inexpensive, and could withstand the elements. Most are easy enough to learn the basics and you can be well on your way to playing them with just a little practice.
UKULELE. It’s small, light weight, easy to play and sounds great. Kala is one of the best uke makers on the market. For outdoor enthusiast like us, Kala makes a plastic uke (the Kala Makala Waterman). Play it while rafting, play it on the summits and play it in the rain. The sound does not compare to the wooden versions, but with a price tag of $45, I place this at the top of my list. We were able to pick up this uke at our local family owned outdoor store, Ramsey Outdoor.  It’s great that even outdoor retailers understand the joy a little music on the road can bring you.  By learning 4 different chords (Am, C, F, and G) you’ll be able to play hundreds of extremely popular songs. Oh and if all of that was not enough, they made the uke transparent.

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HARMONICA. This is much more difficult to learn to play but small enough to put in your pocket. It’s relatively rugged and doesn’t have to be tuned. Just take it out and play. They cost between $3 and $45 and you can get a quality one for around $20 so you won’t have to break the bank to try this one out. Down side to the harmonica is each one is in a different key so other people will have to play songs in the key of your harmonica.

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The ocarina is not as well know, unless you played the Legend of Zelda growing up. It also is small enough to fit in your pocket or even hang around your neck (which may result in being picked on, so, don’t say we didn’t warn you!). If you buy a clay or plastic one you don’t have to worry about the weather. Melodies are easy enough to learn and you’ll take all of your friends back to their high school years with your legend of zelda tunes. They cost between and $8 and $30.

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THE MOUTH HARP. I know what you’re thinking, what’s next? The spoons?! It’s small, inexpensive and can hold up to bad weather so here it is.  It can be found in almost every country in the world and depending on the materials it is made out of you can get some crazy sounds. You can grab one for a few dollars so you won’t really be out to much if you give it a try. A disclaimer that my wife insisted I add- your tent mate might decide to take their chance sleeping in the wilderness, far away from you, if you bring the Mouth Harp along (she is not a fan).
Last on our list is just behind the mouth harp, it’s your voice or maybe mine. Singing can be amazingly beautiful to those that are good at it but even if you’re tone deaf…who cares! Singing with friends around a fire is always a good time and if someone in the group has a mouth harp, you can all bust them even if you guys can’t hold a tune yourselves. It’s free and takes up no extra space. Chances are you were going to bring it on your trip anyway.

And if you needed a little more of us in your life, here is a little video of us using our new Kala Makala ukulele.  Keep your eyes glued to our instagram account for a ukulele giveaway curtesy of Ramsey Outdoor.

No matter what you choose to bring with you music and travel go together amazingly.


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